Problem AMSO TLI mostly off plane burn?

MrFickles

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Hey guys, I've recently gotten back into the Apollo missions, completed Apollo 8 on NASSP without any hiccups, but when I try the same mission on AMSO, both LTMFD and IMFD are giving me a TLI solution of 4000-11000 dV, mostly directed off plane.(with LTMFD usually on the low side)

And it's not just Apollo 8, all apollo missions on AMSO have the same problem.

The moon's inclination looks fine, 5 deg from the elliptic. But the Saturn V launch azimuth looks dodgy at 72 degrees.(although I don't think that would cause a -10k dVp to correct)

Realtime burn on IMFD has a reasonable dV of ~3k, but will take me inside the atmosphere, it's the off-axis burn that gives me the weird dV values.
 

Kyle

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The Saturn V inclination is correct for Apollo 8 through 14, though Apollo 15 - 17 went straight east as far as I can remember.
 

Tommy

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One thing to remember is that your simulated flight will NOT be EXACTLY like the real one. Just because you launched right at t=0 doesn't mean your ejection will also match to the second. For instance, if IMFD has you going through the atmosphere it most likely means you are ejecting too soon.

Remember that Orbiter isn't a perfectly accurate simulator. While the vessel may have the correct thrust and ISP, etc, Orbiter doesn't simulate the atmosphere accurately. In real life, things like wind, humidity, and barometric pressure all affect a vessels launch trajectory. A two second difference may not sound like much, but it equates to about 15,000 km difference in position once in orbit.

Start with the historic data, but once in your parking orbit you will have to adjust the TEj to account for differences accumulated in the launch and parking orbit.
 
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