Updates ExoMars News & Updates

jarmonik

Well-known member
Orbiter Contributor
Addon Developer
Beta Tester
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
2,592
Reaction score
736
Points
128
It's kinda sad it didn't work out and that's not good for the 2020 rover mission either. Should it be postponed to 2024 to allow to make another landing test flight in 2020.

Measuring the altitude reliably could be a tough problem. A radar can do that during the final descent but before that it may need to rely on predictions. Deceleration should be easy to measure accurately maybe that could reveal if the descent is too steep but I guess there's not much a lander like that can do about it.
 

GLS

Well-known member
Orbiter Contributor
Addon Developer
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
5,797
Reaction score
2,782
Points
188
Website
github.com
Measuring the altitude reliably could be a tough problem. A radar can do that during the final descent but before that it may need to rely on predictions. Deceleration should be easy to measure accurately maybe that could reveal if the descent is too steep but I guess there's not much a lander like that can do about it.

The radar should start being used as soon as they drop the heatshield. It's about that time it went bad. Did the radar lock onto the heatshield? Twice? And they had no sw protections against using that (wrong) data? Unlikely. My bet is on the radar somehow failing, or more likely, some insulation coming loose and flapping in front of it, giving false distance readings and...... splash! :(
 

Enjo

Mostly harmless
Addon Developer
Tutorial Publisher
Donator
Joined
Nov 25, 2007
Messages
1,665
Reaction score
13
Points
38
Location
Germany
Website
www.enderspace.de
Preferred Pronouns
Can't you smell my T levels?
Anyways, humans will have to wait for landing on Mars a bit longer, or we need to send more of them.
 

Ravenous

Donator
Donator
Joined
Jul 19, 2013
Messages
275
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
sitting at the pointy end
After whining about the dearth of ESA mission technical information, I found something - but on a NASA website!

http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/docs/Bayle_ExoMars_EDM_Overview-Paper.pdf

There's some interesting info in there - figures on some of the components, speeds they were expecting at various points in the landing sequence, when the radar is used (as stated above, after the lower shield is jettisoned) etc. Will take a bit of time to digest but at least it's available.
 

Notebook

Addon Developer
Addon Developer
News Reporter
Donator
Joined
Nov 20, 2007
Messages
11,809
Reaction score
640
Points
188
How critical is the parachute release altitude?
Assuming the speed stabilises when deployed, there is a window between release and rocket firing, too early and you run out of propellant, too late and...

N.
 

Urwumpe

Not funny anymore
Addon Developer
Donator
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
37,527
Reaction score
2,261
Points
203
Location
Wolfsburg
Preferred Pronouns
Sire
Interesting... the radar assembly was not installed fixed, but actually rather loose on the crushable structure to absorb the impact, and was only designed for lower accelerations.

Could the radar have been lost during landing?
 

Notebook

Addon Developer
Addon Developer
News Reporter
Donator
Joined
Nov 20, 2007
Messages
11,809
Reaction score
640
Points
188
Last edited:

Urwumpe

Not funny anymore
Addon Developer
Donator
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
37,527
Reaction score
2,261
Points
203
Location
Wolfsburg
Preferred Pronouns
Sire
A new crater on Mars.
 

APDAF

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 30, 2010
Messages
1,535
Reaction score
396
Points
98
Well it did land... just downwards... at terminal velocity...
 

Thunder Chicken

Fine Threads since 2008
Donator
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
4,247
Reaction score
3,142
Points
138
Location
Massachusetts
Well it did land... just downwards... at terminal velocity...

I keep looking at the photo of the impact and discarded parachute and am forcibly reminded of the old Road Runner cartoons where Wile E. Coyote's ACME parachute streamers and he makes that impact sound way down on the desert floor at the bottom of the cliff.

 
Last edited:

Andy44

owner: Oil Creek Astronautix
Addon Developer
Joined
Nov 22, 2007
Messages
7,620
Reaction score
6
Points
113
Location
In the Mid-Atlantic states
"Photos show European Mars probe crashed, may have exploded"

https://www.yahoo.com/news/european-space-agency-says-mars-170708902.html

"Estimates are that Schiaparelli dropped from a height of between 2 and 4 kilometers (1.4-2.4 miles), therefore impacting at a considerable speed, greater than 300 kilometers per hour (186 mph)," the agency said.
It said the large disturbance captured in the NASA photographs may have been caused by the probe's steep crash-landing, which would have sprayed matter around like a blast site on Earth.
"It is also possible that the lander exploded on impact, as its thruster propellant tanks were likely still full," the agency said.
 

Scav

Mostly Harmless
Joined
May 8, 2010
Messages
991
Reaction score
1
Points
18
Doubtful, given the fact that it was hydrazine fueled, not bipropellant fueled. More of a mix of "splat" and "crunch".

. o O ( What's the last thing that goes through a lander's mind when it hits the windshield of a Mars . . . )
 

Thunder Chicken

Fine Threads since 2008
Donator
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
4,247
Reaction score
3,142
Points
138
Location
Massachusetts
xkcd What If? levels fast. :lol:

What fraction of c would Schiaparelli have needed to attain for the gravity waves of the impact on Mars to be felt on Earth? Maybe I should submit this to Randall. "But we're not done, because this probe goes to 11."
 
Top