C++ Question How to use "clbkLoadStateEx" within a MFD ?

fred18

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Well, even if you include this fix, its still no complex algorithm.

I agree. I have to say that i made a lot of tests with ms2015 and had a huge amount of issues trying to force the idle status of the vessel, that's why in the end i chose to create a ghost pad for landed rockets. IIRC even forcing the status to landed wasn't enough because often it started anyway to slide if ground wasn't completely flat
 

turtle91

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Many thanks for the inputs.
And I agree, that using the previous method is bad practice in general.
I.e. I used Hover-MFD within a XR1-vessel.
The XR1 has the brake-hack included, but it can cause issues, like I have seen yesterday:

-Hover-MFD was landing the XR1
-right after touchdown, the vessel stopped moving(happens in very rare situations), so the XR1 internal-brake-hack was aplied.
-This confused the still active Hover-MFD and Orbiter CTDed
So...some kind of a race condition between the MFD, which controlled the vessel, and the hack, which brute-forced the vessel to "IDLE landed".

Maybe you don't need to know the touchdown points: attachment can be anywhere, we just care about the visual, right? Then you can have the attachment point of the moving vessel in its (0,0,0), and query for its position with reference to the planet. In orbiter 2010 i would have said that the height from the ground would be the difference between distance from the planet and the planet radius, so you would just need to put the attachment point of the landed vessel at that height from the ground. In the new orbiter it's not true, but i'm sure that if you dig a bit you can find a way (i'm thinking i.e. of first creating the landed vessel, find its distance from planet center, then apply the attachment)

I was thinking on the visuals and that the attached user-vessel should be slightly above the surface.
Just to avoid a jumping-to-space user-vessel after the brake has been released again.

But you gave me some good input, so I have something to think and read about for the next days. :thumbup:
 
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