I wonder what playlists they are jamming to?

Keatah

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And of course apple would go Intellectual Property on our collective asses...

I didn't think about that one.. I'll just keep running iTunes in a separate window when jamming with Orbiter.


At first I didn't think it looked like an iPod, especially after zooming in. I thought it was a calculator. Then I realized after researching that it appears to be a first-gen Nano, which I hadn't seen before.

I sincerely hope he didn't have Elton John's Rocket Man blaring through speakers on the flight deck. That would be too corny, I'm afraid.

It is actually this one, The 4th gen classic, the first one without the soft buttons up-top. Note the thickness and the size of the screen borders.
ipod-classic-4th-generation.jpg
Rocketman is indeed frequently on their playlists. Sometimes via their choice, or one of those pr stunts where students put together playlists, or the astronaut's family makes the playlist.


Most batteries can overheat and explode. Or just explode (NiH2 batteries like on the ISS are nominally pressurized inside to 60-80 bar, just overheat them slightly and they exceed burst pressure).

True on that. Totally cool they use batteries pressurized to 1000psi!


(Just to ensure we talk about the same picture: I am not talking about this one: http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=22729)


I have yet to see anything later than a 4th gen ipod on a us space vehicle yet.
 

RisingFury

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Most batteries can overheat and explode. Or just explode (NiH2 batteries like on the ISS are nominally pressurized inside to 60-80 bar, just overheat them slightly and they exceed burst pressure).


Hmmmm... maybe they reduced weight by sacrificing strong case.

LiH2 batteries are standard for starting up nitro engines on RC planes. You stick them on top of the glow plug plug and it sends the current through the plug, making it glow. You then turn the propeller either with your fingers or with a starter...

When the engine starts running, the heat travels up the metal and reaches the battery. Battery also gets warm when it's being recharged, even though the chargers are usually limited to 100 or 200 mA, so it takes all day to recharge the battery...

LiH2 batteries are used for glow plugs because they don't mind being short-circuited and because they have long life and in excess of 10 000 charge cycles.


Most Lithium fires come from LiPo batteries on competition RC helis. Voltages there often exceed 50 V and currents often go over 150A. When a cell overheats and pops, all you see is a streak of fire flying through the sky.
 
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T.Neo

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What a clever thing to do: :dry:


I have new respect for lithium batteries now. :blink:
 

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I wonder if NASA has flown anybody with serious hard rock and metal on their playlists. Do their shrinks screen for that sort of thing?
 
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